Variant of Static Dynamic Stretch Method

adminTraining Tips

One of the less known methods I use for developing flexibility is a variant of the Static-Dynamic method. I learned of this method originally from Joel Jameison’s book “Ultimate MMA Conditioning”. There, it’s presented as a anaerobic-lactic capacity development method.

In a nutshell, the method calls for performing two reps of a strength exercise, then a 10 second isometric hold in the stretched position, then 2 more reps, then 10 sec hold, and so on – for 3 to 10 minutes straight! Obviously, only light weights can be used with this method.

I’ve tweaked it a bit to use it as a method of flexibility development. You need to be used to the position or exercise you’ll be using it in, and have already developed some capacity there. Don’t just jump in and do it with an unfamiliar movement! Also, you need to be sure that you really have a structural length issue that needs to be addressed – just because a muscle tests short does not always mean that stretching is the solution.

Start with 3 minutes, build slowly up to 5 minutes. In some cases, I’ll use 2 x 5 min sets for very experienced athletes. (rest 2-3 minutes between sets) Perform shaking and vibration drills after each set to reduce tension in the muscles.

Perform up to 2 x week maximum. This method must be inserted into your program carefully, taking into account all variables. It is very fatiguing, both locally and also to the CNS. It is a strength exercise, so it must be considered as such when planning your total volume. I would suggest 3 weeks max of this method before taking a recovery week.
For optimal results, actively pull yourself into the stretch on the isometric hold, strengthening the muscles responsible for the regressive portion of the movement as well.

In the video, I am demonstrating an abbreviated version of the protocol with the Ginga Lunge (or Diagonal Stretch), something I originally learned from Ido Portal. Though you can use this in numerous positions, I use it primarily in the above position, seated Good Mornings, Pancake position, and Front and Middle Splits.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

One of the less known methods I use for developing flexibility is a variant of the Static-Dynamic method. I learned of this method originally from Joel Jameison's book "Ultimate MMA Conditioning". There, it's presented as a anaerobic-lactic capacity development method.In a nutshell, the method calls for performing two reps of a strength exercise, then a 10 second isometric hold in the stretched position, then 2 more reps, then 10 sec hold, and so on – for 3 to 10 minutes straight! Obviously, only light weights can be used with this method.I've tweaked it a bit to use it as a method of flexibility development. You need to be used to the position or exercise you'll be using it in, and have already developed some capacity there. Don't just jump in and do it with an unfamiliar movement! Also, you need to be sure that you really have a structural length issue that needs to be addressed – just because a muscle tests short does not always mean that stretching is the solution. Start with 3 minutes, build slowly up to 5 minutes. In some cases, I'll use 2 x 5 min sets for very experienced athletes. (rest 2-3 minutes between sets) Perform shaking and vibration drills after each set to reduce tension in the muscles. Perform up to 2 x week maximum. This method must be inserted into your program carefully, taking into account all variables. It is very fatiguing, both locally and also to the CNS. It is a strength exercise, so it must be considered as such when planning your total volume. I would suggest 3 weeks max of this method before taking a recovery week.For optimal results, actively pull yourself into the stretch on the isometric hold, strengthening the muscles responsible for the regressive portion of the movement as well. In the video, I am demonstrating an abbreviated version of the protocol with the Ginga Lunge (or Diagonal Stretch), something I originally learned from Ido Portal. Though you can use this in numerous positions, I use it primarily in the above position, seated Good Mornings, Pancake position, and Front and Middle Splits.

Posted by Scott Hagnas on Friday, April 10, 2015